The Importance of Good Venipuncture

This is a short, but vital, post. If you’re anything like me, you’ve had more than your lifetime’s share of needle sticks. Chronic pain / illness patients get a lot of blood drawn, right? Well, I’ve been getting blood drawn at my family practice doc’s office for the last few years. But the last time one of their nurses drew my blood, I had a 3″ x 2″ bruise AND a huge lump! If that wasn’t enough, I actually had a needle scratch near the site too. Clearly, this nurse was NOT skilled at venipuncture. And the lump? It was there because she not only punctured my vein as she entered, but then kept on going and punctured the other side of the vein too.

This was of course completely unacceptable. I called the doc’s office to let them know (kindly) that this particular nurse had been sorely lacking in skills. And remind them that it’s especially unacceptable on a patient who is immunosuppressed. They did apologize, and suggested that I request a different nurse the next time. Yup … you bet!

Instead, I decided to do what I had done some years ago. I decided to make friends with some people who do nothing but venipuncture – at a local diagnostic lab location. I chose Quest Diagnostics because they had been processing the blood from the doctor anyway. So I assumed (rightly) that my health insurance would cover that lab. And let me tell you, this was the right choice!

The lab tech was fantastic! Friendly, professional, no waiting, and most of all … really, really skilled at venipuncture. The bruise is only the size of a pencil eraser, if that! Minimal pain and maximum patient satisfaction. Definitely worth the switch!

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Choosing both medical and integrative approaches

As a holistic health coach, I am blessed to be part of a large and vibrant community of progressive-thinking folks. I have learned a tremendous amount about nutrition and ultimately about wellness from my training and experience. In fact, it’s this kind of naturally-based healing/health that I have focused on my whole life.

Many years ago I was a leader for Weight Watchers … my first experience with “diet” and nutrition programs. I’ve done yoga for years, and spent a lot of time at gyms working out before that. I’ve had acupuncture. I’ve trained in Reiki and receive it regularly. I’ve received other types of energy healing regularly for years. I’m a massage therapist who depends mightily on a weekly massage (and have for 6+ years). I love having green smoothies and shopping at my local farmers’ markets. I believe in the power of prayer. And for the most part, I’ve always tried a lot of natural healing methods before turning to medical care.

And despite all this stuff … the RA symptoms started. Reiki and massage didn’t help (although they certainly didn’t make anything worse). I tried to keep eating healthy, but my ability to exercise became severely limited. I had to cut my work schedule back by 20% to keep the incredible pain in my hands at bay. Symptoms didn’t get better when I wasn’t working either. Weight gain ensued … and it was all depressing. I hung in there with the natural healing methods as best I could, but I knew it wasn’t going to be enough. I’d reached a fork in the road.

Choose left or right?

It was time to pursue medical diagnosis and treatment. You’ve read about that process here on the blog, so I won’t repeat it. But let me summarize the results: I feel a thousand percent better! Practically my old self. I continue to pursue all my natural health and wellness methods, which support the medical process that keeps me going.

What I discovered is that it isn’t a fork in the road, but a new path. I don’t have to give up the things that have always helped me. I don’t have to feel guilty about getting the medical treatment I need to be well. In fact, my rheumatologist has been pretty darn impressed with my incredibly low inflammation levels. The other RA indicators are still positive, but my liver is processing the meds in the healthy way and my overall symptoms feel mostly under control.

So for those who might judge because I’ve chosen to integrate these (sometimes opposing) paths … take a walk in my shoes before you tell me I’ve done myself wrong. And remember, I wear mostly “sensible” shoes now … not the beautiful higher heels of my youth. So it may not be as easy or much fun to be in my shoes … but I’m happy here. Isn’t that what life is all about?

**This blog post is part of a larger Blog Carnival organized by Rheumatoid Arthritis Warrior, Kelly Young. Please visit the other posts as well … this carnival’s topic is “Resistance to Rheumatology Treatment”**

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